Negative Interest Rates Are Here. JP Morgan private banker: “We can’t make money anymore.”

Negative interest rates are an indication the financial system is totally broken. As it is used presently, it was never designed to be equitable, honorable or sustainable. The creation of debt is the largest commodity that any ‘nation’ exports, and for a banking institution to steal from its accounts openly, indicates that it is on life support.

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The pyramid structure/scheme is the problem, it creates hierarchy as well as hubris, and hinders our altruistic human capacities; leaving us to lay waste to our mother earth.


Could this be a sign of things to come in other nations?

It would seem so, and while this can be looked at as a herald of the coming financial collapse, it is also our greatest chance to awaken others.


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The truth about the financial system would make any one who values their energy and time, in the form of bank credit or money, to revolt against the debt slavery system.


Whether we fall headlong into another form of financial servitude is largely determined by humanities capacity to recognize the truth.


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Now is the time to share this with the unconscious minds around us so as to offer them a gateway of empowerment, and lead to an eventual shift in the paradigms of external control on Earth. – Justin Deschamps, Stillness in the Storm


“Yesterday over coffee, a friend of mine leaked the news that JP Morgan’s private banking division here in Singapore is going to start charging negative interest rates.”


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Interest rates are now negative, below zero, for a growing number of borrowers, mainly in the financial markets. It means in effect they are being paid to borrow someone else’s money. So what on earth is going on? Click here to learn more.

JPMorgan Chase recently sent a letter to some of its large depositors telling them it didn’t want their stinking money anymore. Well, not in those words. The bank coined a euphemism: Beginning on May 1, it said, it will charge certain customers a “balance sheet utilization fee” of 1 percent a year on deposits in excess of the money they need for their operations. That amounts to a negative interest rate on deposits. The targeted customers—mostly other financial institutions—are already snatching their money out of the bank. Which is exactly what CEO Jamie Dimon wants. The goal is to shed $100 billion in deposits, and he’s about 20 percent of the way there so far.

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Pause for a second and marvel at how strange this is. Banks have always paid interest to depositors. We’ve entered a new era of surplus in which banks—some, anyway—are deigning to accept money only if customers are willing to pay for the privilege.


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It’s not unusual for interest rates to be negative in the sense of being lower than the rate of inflation. If the Federal Reserve pushes interest rates below inflation to stimulate growth, it becomes cheaper to borrow and buy something now than to wait to make the purchase. If you wait, inflation could make prices go up by more than what you owe on the loan. You can also think of it as inflation reducing the effective amount you owe.


It’s a new era of banks deigning to accept money only if customers are willing to pay for the privilege:


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What is rarer is for interest rates to go negative on a nominal basis—i.e., even before accounting for inflation. The theory was always that if you tried to impose a negative nominal rate, people would just take their money from the bank and store cash in a private vault or under a mattress to escape the penalty of paying interest on their own money. When the Federal Reserve slashed the federal funds rate in 2008 to combat the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression, it stopped cutting at zero to 0.25 percent, which it assumed to be the absolute floor, the zero lower bound. It turned to buying bonds (“quantitative easing”) to lower long-term rates and give the economy more juice.

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“At the end fiat money returns to its inner value – zero.” – Voltaire

Over the past year or so, however, zero has turned out to be a permeable boundary. Several central banks have discovered that depositors will tolerate some rates below zero if withdrawing cash and storing it themselves is costly and inconvenient. Investors will buy bonds with negative yields if they believe rates will fall further, allowing them to sell the bonds at a profit. (Bond prices rise when rates fall.) Global investors are also willing to put money into a nation’s negative-yielding securities if they expect its currency to rise in value.

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Now comes the interesting part. There are signs of an innovation war over negative interest rates. There’s a surge of creativity around ways to drive interest rates deeper into negative territory, possibly by abolishing cash or making it depreciable. And there’s a countersurge around how to prevent rates from going more deeply negative, by making cash even more central and useful than it is now. As this new world takes shape, cash becomes pivotal.

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Money power has been created through the manipulation of the national monetary system. Bankers authored the quotation, “Money is power.” In our current world money is more important than morality. It is believed that we can accomplish anything through money.

The idea of abolishing or even constraining physical bank notes is anathema to a lot of people. If there’s one thing that militias and Tea Partiers hate more than “fiat money” that’s not backed by gold, it’s fiat money that exists only in electronic form, where it can be easily tracked and controlled by the government. “The anonymity of paper money is liberating,” says Stephen Cecchetti, a professor at Brandeis International Business School and former economic adviser to the Bank for International Settlements in Basel, Switzerland. “The bottom line is, you have to decide how you want to run your society.”

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All of which of these currencies is a different variation of debt/theft; where debt is slavery and interest is extortion.

As long as paper money is available as an alternative for customers who want to withdraw their deposits, there’s a limit to how low central banks can push rates. At some point it becomes cost-effective to rent a warehouse for your billions in cash and hire armed guards to protect it. We may be seeing glimmerings of that in Switzerland, which has a 1,000 Swiss franc note ($1,040) that’s useful for large transactions. The number of the big bills in circulation usually peaks at yearend and then shrinks about 6 percent in the first two months of the new year, but this year, with negative rates a reality, the number instead rose 1 percent through February, according to data released on April 21.

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“I sincerely believe that banking establishments are more dangerous than standing armies, and that the principle of spending money to be paid by posterity, under the name of funding, is but swindling futurity on a large scale.” – Thomas Jefferson

Bank notes, as an alternate storehouse of value, are a constraint on central banks’ power. “We view this constraint as undesirable,” Citigroup Global Chief Economist Willem Buiter and a colleague, economist Ebrahim Rahbari, wrote in an April 8 research piece. They laid out three ways that central banks could foil cash hoarders: One, abolish paper money. Two, tax paper money. Three, sever the link between paper money and central bank reserves.

Abolishing paper money and forcing people to use electronic accounts could free central banks to lower interest rates as much as they feel necessary while crimping the underground economy, Buiter and Rahbari write: “In our view, the net benefit to society from giving up the anonymity of currency holdings is likely to be positive (including for tax compliance).” Taxing cash, an idea that goes back to German economist Silvio Gesell in 1916, is probably unworkable, the economists conclude: You’d have to stamp bills to show tax had been paid on them. The third idea involves declaring that all wages and prices are set in terms of the official reserve currency—and that paper money is a depreciating asset, almost like a weak foreign currency. That approach, the Citi economists write, “is both practical and likely to be effective.” Last year, Harvard University economist Kenneth Rogoff wrote a paper favoring exploration of “a more proactive strategy for phasing out the use of paper currency.”

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Debt is servitude and interest is extortion. However, the Constitution is clear, and is why we should be happy to have congress coin, create and regulate legal tender, as the founders clearly intended.

Pushing back against the cash-abolition camp is a group of people who want to make cash more convenient, even for large transactions. Cecchetti and co-author Kermit Schoenholtz, of New York University’s Stern School of Business, suggest a “cash reserve account” that would keep people from having to pay for things by sending cash in armored trucks. During the day, funds in the account would be payable just like money in a checking account. But every night they’d be swept into cash held in a vault, sparing the money from the negative interest rate that would apply to money in an ordinary checking account. In a way, physical cash would take on a role similar to that played by gold in an earlier era of banking.

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If we want to deal with the big social, economic and environmental challenges that we’re facing today, we should start by fixing money.

Like chemotherapy, negative interest rates are a harsh medicine. It’s disorienting when people are paid to borrow and charged to save. “Over time, market disequilibria are dangerous,” G+ Economics Chief Economist Lena Komileva wrote to clients on April 21. Which side of the debate you fall on probably comes down to how much you trust government. On one side, there’s an argument to be made that cash has become what John Maynard Keynes once called gold: a barbarous relic. It thwarts monetary policy and makes life easy for criminals and tax evaders: Seventy-eight percent of the value of American currency is in $100 bills. On the other side, if you’re afraid that central banks are in a war against savers, or that the government will try to control your financial affairs, cash is your best defense. Taking it away “is a prescription for revolution,” Cecchetti says. The longer rates break on through to the other side, the more pressing these questions become.

Will you be prepared when everything we take for granted changes overnight? Just think about this for a couple of minutes. What if the U.S. Dollar wasn’t the world’s reserve currency?


Ponder that… What if…

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The historical pattern has formed and is already underway in many parts of the world, including the United States.



Empires rise, they peak, they decline, they collapse, this is the cycle of history.


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“That men do not learn very much from the lessons of history is the most important of all the lessons that history has to teach.” – Aldous Huxley


Don’t be one of the millions of people who gets their savings, retirement, and investments wiped out. 


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Sources: [1][2][3]

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Related: Greece To Close Banks, Impose Capital Controls Amid Looming Default | Bank Run Empties Over A Third Of ATMs Of Cash

Related: RV/Gold Bait and Switch? – Secular Value vs Absolute Value – Hidden History of Gold

Related: Globalist Agenda Watch 2015: Update 51 – Guess who’s running the new BRICS Bank

Related: Stock Market Suggests Major Collapse Incoming For The Last Six Months Of 2015

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